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Pew Hispanic Center – Chronicling Latinos Diverse Experiences in a Changing America

Today’s Mexican Americans were once native Americans.  Today they makeup the largest “minority” in our nation.  America’s makeup is changing and Ellis Island and Pilgrims are no longer what is driving and shaping America.  Today’s America is more and more Latino and its growth currents and demographics are being shaped by a continuously growing Mexican American population.

What are you doing to understand this reality for your business, your professional goals or the diversity that is omnipresent in our labor market?  Read the following article from the Pew Foundation to help you understand…

“The size of the Mexican-origin population in the U.S. has risen dramatically over the past four decades—from 5.4 million in 1970 to a record 33.7 million in 2012. Between 1980 and 2000, the arrival of Mexican immigrants was the main driver of growth, but as immigration from Mexico slowed between 2000 and 2010, U.S. births overtook immigration as the dominant source of U.S. Mexican-origin population growth. Despite slowing immigration from Mexico, Mexican immigrants are by far the single largest immigrant group in the U.S.”

via Pew Hispanic Center – Chronicling Latinos Diverse Experiences in a Changing America.

Filed under: News, , , , ,

Daily Number: Youth Vote Undergoes Big Racial, Ethnic Changes – Pew Research Center

The Pew foundation continues to light our path forward with data that illuminates a view of a future, more diverse America that seems to be here now…

 

“The racial and ethnic composition of young voters has shifted dramatically over the last four presidential elections.Youth Vote Undergoes Big Racial, Ethnic Changes

Just 58% of voters age 18-29 identified as white non-Hispanics, while 18% were Hispanic, 17% were African American and 7% identified as mixed-race or some other race. The share of young voters who are white has declined 16 points since 2000, when 74% of voters under 30 identified as white and 26% identified as nonwhite.

This stands in sharp contrast to older voters. Fully 76% of voters 30 and older were white, down only six points from 2000. Only 24% of voters 30 and older were nonwhite, including 12% who identified as black and 8% as Hispanic.

The changing demographics of the young vote are significant because President Obama’s support among young voters declined in 2012 among many of the same subgroups in the overall electorate in which he lost ground, particularly whites, men and independents. His losses among young voters since 2008 might have been even greater, but for the fact that Obama won young African Americans and Hispanics by margins that were about as large as in 2008.”

More via Daily Number: Youth Vote Undergoes Big Racial, Ethnic Changes – Pew Research Center.

Filed under: Blogosphere, consumers, Culture Think, Demographic Change, Kid Power, Minority Males, New American Electorate, New Electorate, News, , , , , , ,

Latino Voters in the 2012 Election | Pew Hispanic Center

The Pew Hispanic Center put together some nice tables and statistics on the Latino vote in the President Obama reelection victory …  Clearly Latinos played the biggest role ever in this election since the Clinton victory of 1996.  Of course, PRWOA (the welfare reform law Clinton passed) was not en evil in itself.  What is evil is the employment picture that followed that reform, till this day, in terms of folks that were thrown off the roles and into a jobless economy.  Go figure?

After the Clinton victory, Clinton payed them back with welfare reform…  Hope President Obama pays better… Ya think?  

In any case, enjoy the numbers…

Latinos voted for President Barack Obama over Republican Mitt Romney by 71% to 27%, according to an analysis of exit polls by the Pew Hispanic Center, a Project of the Pew Research Center.1

Obama’s national vote share among Hispanic voters is the highest seen by a Democratic candidate since 1996, when President Bill Clinton won 72% of the Hispanic vote.

The Center’s analysis finds that Latinos made up 10% of the electorate, as indicated by the national exit poll, up from 9% in 2008 and 8% in 2004.2 The analysis also shows that as a group, non-white voters made up 28% of the nation’s electorate, up from 26% in 2008.3

Battleground States

Hispanics made up a growing share of voters in three of the key battleground states in yesterday’s election—Florida, Nevada and Colorado.

Post-Election Analysis

Changing Face of America Helps Assure Obama Victory

A Milestone En Route to a Majority Minority Nation

How the Faithful Voted: 2012 Preliminary Analysis

Obama carried Florida’s Hispanic vote 60% to 39%, an improvement over his 57% to 42% showing in 2008. Also, Hispanics made up 17% of the Florida electorate this year, up from 14% in 2008.

The state’s growing non-Cuban population—especially growth in the Puerto Rican population in central Florida—contributed to the president’s improved showing among Hispanic voters. This year, according to the Florida exit poll, 34% of Hispanic voters were Cuban while 57% were non-Cuban. Among Cuban voters, the vote was split—49% supported Obama while 47% supported Romney. Among the state’s non-Cuban voters, Obama won 66% versus 34% for Romney.

via Latino Voters in the 2012 Election | Pew Hispanic Center.

Filed under: Blogosphere, Culture Think, Demographic Change, Election 2012, ethnicity in politics, Latinos, News, Vote, , , , , ,

The Demographics of the Jobs Recovery | Pew Hispanic Center

I. OVERVIEW

Two years after the U.S. labor market hit bottom, the economic recovery has yielded slow but steady gains in employment for all groups of workers. The gains, however, have varied across demographic groups, with Hispanics and Asians, in particular, experiencing a faster rate of growth in jobs than other groups. Their employment levels are higher now than just before the start of the Great Recession in December 2007, a milestone not yet reached by white and black workers.

 

The disparate trends in the jobs recovery from 2009 to 2011 reflect the rapidly changing demographics of the American workforce. Although jobs growth for Hispanics and Asians was more rapid than for other groups, it merely kept pace with the growth in their working-age (ages 16 and older) populations. The slower rate of jobs growth for whites and blacks reflects the relatively slow growth in their populations. Thus, the share of each group’s population that is employed, the employment rate, has barely risen since the end of the recession, according to new Pew Research Center analysis of government data.

via The Demographics of the Jobs Recovery | Pew Hispanic Center.

Filed under: Blogosphere, consumers, Culture Think, Demographic Change, Discrimination, Election 2012, Immigration, Job Sector, News, Public Policy, Racism, Unemployment, WeSeeReason, , , , , ,

Education | Pew Hispanic Center

Educational outcomes differ between native-born and immigrant Latinos and between Latinos and other racial and ethnic groups. Measuring those differences and the factors that produce them are critical to understanding the Latino future. The Center’s research focuses on trends in school enrollment and educational attainment.

Also see our statistical portraits, state and county databases, demographic profiles and Census 2010 tables for data on the characteristics of the Latino and foreign-born populations in the United States.

MORE via Education | Pew Hispanic Center.

Filed under: access to education, Blogosphere, Culture Think, Education Policy, , , , ,

When Labels Don’t Fit: Hispanics and Their Views of Identity – Pew Research Center

It has been nearly four decades since the United States government mandated the use by federal agencies of the terms “Hispanic” or “Latino” to categorize Americans who trace their roots to Spanish-speaking countries, but the labels still haven’t been fully embraced by the group to which they have been affixed.

Only about one-quarter (24%) of Hispanic adults say they most often identify themselves by “Hispanic” or “Latino,” according to a new nationwide survey of Hispanic adults by the Pew Hispanic Center, a project of the Pew Research Center. About half (51%) say they identify themselves most often by their family’s country or place of origin-using such terms as Mexican, Cuban, Puerto Rican, Salvadoran or Dominican. And 21% say they use the term “American” most often to describe themselves. The share rises to 40% among those who were born in the U.S.

MORE via When Labels Don’t Fit: Hispanics and Their Views of Identity – Pew Research Center.

Filed under: Blogosphere, consumers, Culture Think, Demographic Change, Election 2012, , , ,

Labor Force Growth Slows, Hispanic Share Grows | Pew Hispanic Center

Hispanics will account for three-quarters of the growth in the nation’s labor force from 2010 to 2020, according to new projections from the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS). One major reason is that the Hispanic population is growing rapidly due to births and immigration. At the same time, the aging of the non-Hispanic white population is expected to reduce their numbers in the labor force.

A second important factor is that Hispanics have a higher labor force participation rate than other groups. The nation’s labor force participation rate—that is, the share of the population ages 16 and older either employed or looking for work—was 64.7% in 2010. Among Hispanics, the rate was 67.5%. There are two main explanations for this gap: Hispanics are a younger population than other groups, and include a higher share of immigrants.

MORE via Labor Force Growth Slows, Hispanic Share Grows | Pew Hispanic Center.

Filed under: access to education, Blogosphere, consumers, Culture Think, Job Sector, News, WeSeeReason, , ,

Hispanics Say They Have the Worst of a Bad Economy | Pew Hispanic Center

I. OVERVIEW

A majority of Latinos (54%) believe that the economic downturn that began in 2007 has been harder on them than on other groups in America.

Large shares report that they or someone in their household has been out of work in the past year (59%); that their personal finances are in “only fair” or “poor” shape (75%); that they canceled or delayed a major purchase in the past year (49%); or that they are underwater on their mortgage (28% of Latino homeowners).

MORE via Hispanics Say They Have the Worst of a Bad Economy | Pew Hispanic Center.

Filed under: access to education, Blogosphere, consumers, Culture Think, Demographic Change, Discrimination, Economic Recession, Election 2012, ethnicity in politics, Immigration, Latinos, News, Racism, Unemployment, WeSeeReason, , , ,

For Many Latinos, Race Is More Culture Than Color – NYTimes.com

Every decade, the Census Bureau spends billions of dollars and deploys hundreds of thousands of workers to get an accurate portrait of the American population. Among the questions on the census form is one about race, with 15 choices, including …

MORE via For Many Latinos, Race Is More Culture Than Color – NYTimes.com.

Filed under: Blogosphere, Culture Think, Demographic Change, Discrimination, ethnicity in politics, Immigration, Latinos, News, Vote, WeSeeReason, , ,

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