THE POLICY THINKSHOP "Think Together"

Public Policy is social agreement written down as a universal guide for social action. We at The Policy ThinkShop share information so others can think and act in the best possible understanding of "The Public Interest."

Five million families and children will now sleep a little easier. How will the new Latino/Hispanic immigrant status impact healthcare policy?

Being “in the shadows” has long been a healthcare access issue.  The broken healthcare system has been aggravated by a broken immigration system. Immigration and healthcare are tied together in many ways, especially for the economically disadvantaged.

According to the New York Times:

What Is President Obama’s Immigration Plan?

President Obama announced on Thursday evening a series of executive actions to grant up to five million unauthorized immigrants protection from deportation. The president is also planning actions to direct law enforcement priorities toward criminals, allow high-skilled workers to move or change jobs more easily, and streamline visa and court procedures, among others. NOV. 20, 2014 RELATED ARTICLE

close story-meta-footer

close story-meta

Who could be affected?

The president’s plan is expected to affect up to five million of the nation’s unauthorized immigrant population, currently 11.4 million according to the Migration Policy Institute. It would create a new program of deferrals for approximately 3.7 undocumented parents of American citizens or legal permanent residents who have been in the country for at least five years. Deferrals would include authorization to work and would be granted for three years at a time.

It would also expand a program created by the administration in 2012 called Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, or DACA, which allows young people who were brought into the country as children to apply for deportation deferrals and work permits. The plan would extend eligibility to people who entered the United States as children before January 2010 (the cutoff is currently June 15, 2007). It would also increase the deferral period to three years from two years and eliminate the requirement that applicants be under 31 years old. About 1.2 million young immigrants are currently eligible, and the new plan would expand eligibility to approximately 300,000 more.

It would not provide a path to full legal status or benefits under the Affordable Care Act. Officials have said that the president’s plan will not provide specific protection for farm workers or parents of DACA-eligible immigrants.

Filed under: ACA and Medicaid, Blogosphere, Data Trends - American Demographics and Public Opinion, Family Policy, Feminization of Poverty, Health Literacy, Health Policy, Healthcare Reform, Immigration, Latinos, Maternal and Child Health, Medicaid, News, Public Health, Public Policy,

Addressing Deep and Persistent Poverty: A Framework for Philanthropic Planning and Investment

Given the last decade of a deep and lingering economic downturn, mortgage failures, Wall Street scandals and scams that brought much misfortune to the otherwise fortunate, poverty is no longer a controversial topic that afflicts the few and shakes the policy corridors of Washington.  The new poverty, according to most experts, affects families and children, the hard to employ and many struggling families who face their at home kids’ college loan bills without the benefit of Jr.’s paycheck.

Perhaps now is a good “quiet and tranquil” time to study the issue of the less fortunate without the cacophony of stakeholder voices drowning out reason.  Perhaps now that Occupy this and that has all but disappeared, the issue of poverty can occupy the voices of reason …

To be sure, the JPB foundation and the Urban Institute have recently partnered to produce an intelligent overview and analytical tools for looking, not only at poverty, but at what they term “deep poverty.”

The Policy ThinkShop provides you with the following link at an article to peruse the issue or the following downloadable report which will give you a deeper look at the deep poverty issue:

http://www.urban.org/UploadedPDF/412983-addressing-deep-poverty.pdf

“The JPB Foundation engaged the Urban Institute to provide background on the problem of deep and persistent poverty in the United States. This paper summarizes the history of US antipoverty policies, synthesizes existing knowledge about poverty and deep poverty, and presents a framework for understanding the complex and multi-faceted landscape of antipoverty efforts today. It also draws on interviews with over 30 experts, philanthropists, and thought leaders in the field to review and distill the most current thinking about promising strategies for tackling deep and persistent poverty. Drawing on these facts and insights, we present a series of questions and choices that any foundation wishing to invest in this area would be well-advised to consider.”

More via Addressing Deep and Persistent Poverty: A Framework for Philanthropic Planning and Investment.

Filed under: ACA and Medicaid, access to education, Blogosphere, Children and Poverty, Data Trends - American Demographics and Public Opinion, Demographic Change, Feminization of Poverty, Medicaid Expansion, News, Public Policy

How to reduce health inequities? | LinkedIn

One of our Policy ThinkShop bloggers posting on other social media regarding poverty policy, or the lack there of, in our country ….

Thanks for the report updating the latest ideas on our ongoing discourse on poverty and for getting us to think about the important connections between education, poverty and health.

The report rehashes, mostly academic, arguments regarding race, statistics, the infamous 1969 poverty measure and the poverty measure’s successive fabrications. I was in graduate school at the University of Chicago in the mid 80s when William J. Wilson led a “one man band” against the Reagan Administration’s and Charles Murray’s assault on “the welfare state, the welfare mother, and so on…”

I sat in Prof. Gary Orfield’s office one day while he fielded a call from the then Ronald Reagan stacked Civil Rights Commission which Prof. Orfield was a member of. It was a turning point for me in how I would henceforth see the role that well-meaning advocates play in our government’s institutions. After nearly four decades experiencing health and human services policy and planning in our nation’s state and local systems, that lesson still holds—facts are not enough, we must do. The problem becomes who is the “we”?

MOre via How to reduce health inequities? | LinkedIn.

Filed under: Blogosphere, Children and Poverty, Culture Think, Education Policy, Family Policy, Feminization of Poverty, Health Policy, Maternal and Child Health, Medicaid, Medicaid Expansion, News, Philanthropy

Texas Senate Approves Strict Abortion Measure – NYTimes.com

Are we really going to let the political barrens impoverish our political discourse yet again with another season of the “abortion debate”?

When a young women agonizes about being pregnant or we, as a society, have to deal with the horror of a baby not being born because the women carrying it chooses not to do so, must we take sides and make a spectacle out of that perinatal situation?  

Those weeks prior to a baby’s birth and the first few weeks of their lives are magical.  But we are not talking here about having a baby or planning to have one.  We are talking about, for whatever reason, an unwanted pregnancy.  To be sure, the abortion debate is more about a women’s choice whether to reach the perinatal period in the first place.  Being pregnant in the early stages is greatly defined by why you are pregnant.  It just is.

But abortion, like so many semantically charged issues, has become a political boogyman in our society that is pulled out in the battle of women’s liberation vs. the self proclaimed “moral majority”.  Imagine that–intelligent people on both sides let the boogyman out.  Today’s media circus allows the few to speak for the many.  In this way, an artificial discourse develops and is seen as real and scientific regarding public opinion.  Public media becomes public opinion.  

Abortion is a sad and horrible fact.  The use of the issue as political fodder is wrong.  The less sexy issue is the feminization of poverty, for example–how so many women are uneducated, disempowered and abused.  Abortion further demonizes these women and their circumstances.  Perhaps people of means who have internal demons are more comfortable with boogymen and as such summon them or at least willingly join the party.  That women get pregnant in circumstances that are not optimal for the commitment to the growth and birth of the fetus is a fact of life that is not likely to go away.  What we do about it as families, neighborhoods and communities to support women’s sexual health is the real issue.  Politicians rallying masses of voters will not help solve the central question. Women’s sexual health is often compromised and the outcome of child birth is too often a big problem.

Smart powerful women, or conservative ladies who have their husband’s power behind them, have the time and wherewithal to go on these intellectual and perhaps spiritual pony rides.  On the other hand you have the women who do not have the means.  Most of these anguishing women  and the fetuses which define their predicament are canon fodder in the “good fight”.  There are four kinds of people in this struggle.  There are the good people fighting the evil people.  There are the people who are considered the evil people by the good.  There are the people who are considered crazy by most bystanders who have to endure the charade.  It’s really difficult to tell who is who–it depends where one is standing.

Abortion has never been a problem for those who have the means to deal with it.  That is, to avoid it and have the baby put up for adoption as many did in before the 1970s when the choice became endorsed and supported–liberating young women seemingly everywhere.    Today, it is still being dealt with by those of means.  That is, conservative politicians looking to drum up support from the believing masses and women’s rights groups who have the wherewithal to define the fight, educate the soldiers, and speak in one voice for such a cacophony of human suffering and hope.   This sanguine struggle pales in comparison to any other civil rights issue because it is so private and at its center is not baby killing but a single women’s choice about her body, her psyche and perhaps her soul.  How many issues involve sex, blood, shame, hell and even death?  But poverty has seized to be the issue of the day and sexuality and babies make for better television.  Long gone are the poor welfare mothers who were the demons of yesterday for some and the soldiers in the minds of liberal causes.  Bill Clinton had his way with so many women, not to mention the million he kicked off of welfare with his Welfare Act.  At last, irony forces all of us to open our eyes and think.  Who is really the friend of these women in their darkest hour?

The truth may be that abortion has become an ideological scapegoat, a powerful political tool and a cattle call. Instead of really coming together and fixing the problems that divide us as a nation and impoverish us as communities, abortion as a maternal and child health perspective divides us, brings out the worst in many, and does not solve the ageless problem of child birth as a challenge that overcomes some.  But abortion is good politics because it gets folks riled up, to dig in their pockets and to pound the pavement for a cause.  Right or wrong–right or left…  It all depends where you stand…  It rarely depends on where the most disempowered young and scared women stand.  The choice is personal, spiritual and perhaps mostly economic.  It’s not about women’s liberation… It’s more about having the means–and in politics having the means means getting votes… Abortion moves people.

Here we go again.  The bread and butter issues were not good enough to rabble up the masses.  It is insane.  It is hardly believable and definitely more difficult to fully comprehend.  We are all getting riled up again about the “A” word.  Never mind that it mostly happens as a consequence of a very private act, without much public notice and with our most private parts.   No… that does not matter to the ideological gladiators right and left who have a ticket to ride because they perceive that their bodies are being controlled or that they must intervene in the most personal and spiritual moment of a women’s life–to help or to judge–to help her make a choice or to make communion with a political church that is pushing popular and political orthodoxy.

“The Texas Senate gave final passage on Friday to one of the strictest anti-abortion measures in the country, legislation championed by Gov. Rick Perry, who rallied the Republican-controlled Legislature late last month after a Democratic filibuster blocked the bill and intensified already passionate resistance by …”

via Texas Senate Approves Strict Abortion Measure – NYTimes.com.

Filed under: Abortion, Blogosphere, ethics, faith-based, Feminization of Poverty, Gender, Gender Policy, ideology, Maternal and Child Health, News, Parenting

The Economist explains: How did the global poverty rate halve in 20 years? | The Economist

As the world’s multiplicity of good and bad personal experiences are seen, quantified and popularized through viral networks and instant messaging, poverty will need to be put into perspective and understood.  Not only what it is but how different it is to many different people in extremely different places.  What ever you think about poverty, understanding the complexities in understanding it and putting it into appropriate perspective is a good place to start… The London Economist is trying to help us with this task…

“POVERTY is easy to spot but hard to define. America sets its poverty line at $11,490 of income per year for a one-person household, or just over $30 a day. Any income below that amount is judged inadequate for the provision of fundamental wants. Other rich countries set their poverty lines in relative terms, so an increase in the incomes of top earners results in more poverty if everything else is held constant. The threshold for dire poverty in developing countries is set much lower, at $1.25 a day of consumption (rather than income). This figure is arrived at by …”

via The Economist explains: How did the global poverty rate halve in 20 years? | The Economist.

Filed under: Blogosphere, Children and Poverty, Culture Think, Feminization of Poverty, , ,

States’ Policies on Health Care Exclude Poorest – NYTimes.com

It is dumbfounding!   It paralyzes the brain, the heart and almost all hope–without need for audacity.

Ph.D.s, advocates, health professionals, and good old moms and dads come to the agreement that healthcare needs changing and that sick people should get help–especially those who have difficulty getting it.  Presumably, it is logical and reasonable to think that many of these people are what we, all of us for hundreds of years, have called “the poor.”

Yet for as long as there have been those with and those without, those with often have the efficacy to get more and those without, perhaps by definition, get even less–always…

So here we are well into healthcare reform and the NYT is sounding the whistle on the haves once again–millions have been spent and the poor are somehow invisible once again when it comes to targeting the needs of those who are hurting and are having a difficult time getting good, reliable, continuos, patient centered, medical home care!  Go figure… or better yet, go read the New York times…

“The refusal by about half the states to expand Medicaid will leave millions of poor people ineligible for government-subsidized health insurance under President Obama’s health care law even as many others with higher incomes receive federal subsidies to …”

More via States’ Policies on Health Care Exclude Poorest – NYTimes.com.

Filed under: access to education, Aging, Behavioral Health Outcomes, Blogosphere, Children and Poverty, consumers, Death and Dying, Economic Recession, Feminization of Poverty, Health and Exercise, Health Literacy, Health Policy, Healthcare Reform, Maternal and Child Health, Medical Research, Medicare, News, Parenting, Policy ThinkShop Comments on other media platforms, Public Health, Public Policy, Public Service, WeSeeReason, , ,

Women’s Health | The Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation

Visit the Kaiser Foundation website by clicking below to get the facts on women’s health.

“Select a subcategory on the left to see how the indicators compare across the states. Results will be shown as a table, map, or trend graph as available.”

via Women’s Health | The Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation.

Filed under: Abortion, access to education, Aging, Behavioral Health Outcomes, Blogosphere, consumers, Feminization of Poverty, Gender, Gender Policy, Health and Exercise, Health Literacy, Health Policy, Healthcare Reform, Public Health, Public Policy, Women's rights, , , , ,

Social policies: Time to scrap affirmative action | The Economist

Affirmative action rears its ugly head once again as the usually intellectually rigorous London Economist magazine publishes an article (link below) making an argument on the deleterious effects of affirmative action policies for beneficiaries, institutions and societies in general.

The main problem with the article is that it sees people of color (or ethnic minorities) as both the “weak classes” and the beneficiaries of these policies.  The article writer fails to understand that a good number of people belonging to the so called “majority” or “white” as the article calls them, are also tremendously disadvantaged and cyclically in poverty by region and sometimes by religious group or region of the country (Catholics compared to Episcopalians and people from the Appalachia region compared to New Yorkers).

The overwhelming majority of people in America are so called “White.”   Poverty is not simply a skin color problem.  Affirmative action is not perfect and plenty of examples can be found of cases in which it is abused or inappropriately taken advantage of.  This does not mean that there’s no need to address historical differences between groups that have experienced circumstances which precluded their development in the educational and business fields, for example.

When  society invests in the children of the poor to ensure that future generations can continue to prosper and contribute to society in greater ways we all benefit.

When specific groups have been locked out for so long that lack of education, sophistication or opportunity defines their relationship to society, then society has a responsibility to address that condition.  Whether we see that “responsibility” as a moral or as a self interested proposition, does not really matter.  The fact is that when societies invest in their citizens they benefit all of society and improve their lot vis a vis other societies who experience the drag and social dislocation caused by an underclass.  The following article in the Economist fails to understand this simple logic.  Read it and tell us what you think?

“ABOVE the entrance to America’s Supreme Court four words are carved: “Equal justice under law”. The court is pondering whether affirmative action breaks that promise. The justices recently accepted a case concerning a vote in Michigan that banned it, and will …”

via Social policies: Time to scrap affirmative action | The Economist.

Filed under: African American, Blogosphere, Children and Poverty, Culture Think, Demographic Change, Discrimination, Education Policy, ethnicity in politics, Feminization of Poverty, Gender, Gender Policy, ideology, Intolerance, Latinos, Minority Males, News, Policy ThinkShop Comments on other media platforms, , ,

Insecure and Unequal: Poverty and Income Among Women and Families, 2000-2011 | National Women’s Law Center

The recovery from the worst recession in memory has hurt the vulnerable in ways that could set families back for a decade…

 

Download the report at:

http://www.nwlc.org/sites/default/files/pdfs/nwlc_2012_povertyreport.pdf

 

“This report provides a gender analysis of national Census data for 2011, released by the Census Bureau in September 2012. The National Women’s Law Center (NWLC) supplies this analysis, as it has for several …”

via Insecure and Unequal: Poverty and Income Among Women and Families, 2000-2011 | National Women’s Law Center.

Filed under: access to education, Blogosphere, Children and Poverty, Economic Recession, Economic Recovery, Family Policy, Feminization of Poverty

The Cost and Coverage Implications of the ACA Medicaid Expansion: National and State-by-State Analysis – Kaiser Family Foundation

The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act promises to change our healthcare system once and for all to solve many of its ongoing malformations and contradictions …  No where is this more true than in its expansion of healthcare services to persons under the Medicaid umbrella.  The Kaiser Foundation web, which always provides data and balanced analysis on the usually controversial health issue and so called “entitlement programs” like Medicaid.  The link below includes an entire report showing estimated impact on each of the 50 states …

“A central goal of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) is to significantly reduce the number of uninsured by providing a continuum of affordable coverage options through Medicaid and new Health Insurance Exchanges.  Following the June 2012 Supreme Court decision, states face a decision about whether to adopt the Medicaid expansion. These decisions will have enormous consequences for health coverage for the low-income population.

This analysis uses the Urban Institute’s Health Insurance Policy Simulation Model (HIPSM) to provide national as well as state-by-state estimates of the impact of ACA on federal and state Medicaid costs, Medicaid enrollment, and the number of uninsured. The analysis shows that the impact of the ACA Medicaid expansion will vary across states based on current coverage levels and the number of uninsured.  This analysis shows that by implementing the Medicaid expansion with other provisions of the ACA, states could significantly reduce the number of uninsured.  Overall state costs of implementing the Medicaid expansion would be modest compared to increases in federal funds, and some states are likely to see small net budget savings.”

More via The Cost and Coverage Implications of the ACA Medicaid Expansion: National and State-by-State Analysis – Kaiser Family Foundation.

Filed under: Behavioral Health Outcomes, Blogosphere, Children and Poverty, Feminization of Poverty, Health Literacy, Health Policy, Healthcare Reform, Maternal and Child Health, News, Public Health, Public Policy, Public Sector, Public Service, Women's rights, ,

More Americans Worry about Financing Retirement | Pew Social & Demographic Trends

The PEW Foundation highlights trends in attitudes about retirement and economic security…

 

Despite a slowly improving economy and a three-year-old stock market rebound, Americans today are more…

via More Americans Worry about Financing Retirement | Pew Social & Demographic Trends.

Filed under: Blogosphere, Culture Think, Economic Recession, Election 2012, Feminization of Poverty, News, Public Policy, The 47%!,

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 2,253 other followers

ThePolicyThinkShop @Twitter

Error: Twitter did not respond. Please wait a few minutes and refresh this page.

Health Alert!

Patriotic Clean, we're headed for deep waters!  It's your choice ...
Conflict at work: Stick to your principles

Conflict at work: Stick to your principles and they will take you far ...

Resources and Latests News: Top Clicks

Who we are:


Public Policy for the rest of us...

Provided by: PolicyABCs

Moderated by: The Policy Think Shop

Categories

We are on Twitter too!

!function(d,s,id){var js,fjs=d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0];if(!d.getElementById(id)){js=d.createElement(s);js.id=id;js.src="//platform.twitter.com/widgets.js";fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js,fjs);}}(document,"script","twitter-wjs");

Recent Posts from our new PolicyABCs Blog: PolicyABCs ... "Thinks with us ..."

We cannot load blog data at this time.

Thank you for visiting. Here are ways you can stay connected to us.

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 2,253 other followers

Goodreads

The ThinkShop promotes connections to all forms of social media to bring you resources beyond what you’ll find in your daily routine…

How Hispanics Describe Themselves

How Hispanics Describe Themselves

Poli Thinkshop

Create Your Badge

Take a "Brain Break" and visit this "fun link" by clicking this image now...

Break for Fun… click video below or have more fun by clicking the pic above…

Policy ThinkShop: Relax, we did the research for you…

Welcome to Policy ABC's ThinkShop, where getting news and public policy analysis is as easy as "A B C."

"The Policy ThinkShop team works hard researching the latests and most interesting news and reports. The resulting links will point you to the original sources so that you can spend as little time as possible getting the most news possible."

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 2,253 other followers

The Policy ThinkShop

ThinkShop Wordle

The Policy ThinkShop

Public Policy and Culture

Policy ThinkShop Resources

Policy ThinkShop Resources for your policy work

Our experts do the searching and serve up the best resources to help you stay on top of key public policy issues.

Featured Twitter Friend: Health Literacy ABCs

Health Literacy

Twitter Friend: MigrationPundit

Policy ThinkShop: “THINK TOGETHER”

"Policy is codified knowledge that stands as a universal guide for social action. Public policy is shaped by those who know and who act on that knowledge. We at The Policy ThinkShop share information so others can think and act in the best possible understanding of "The Public Interest."
%d bloggers like this: