THE POLICY THINKSHOP "Think Together"

Public Policy is social agreement written down as a universal guide for social action. We at The Policy ThinkShop share information so others can think and act in the best possible understanding of "The Public Interest."

Is your doctor happy? With Poll from: Gallup.Com

When you visit your doctor does (s)he look happy?  At the end of the day healthcare is a one on one personal experience.  All the insurance coverage or fancy machines in the world won’t improve medical care if the doctor patient relationship is not optimal.

So what is our healthcare system doing to address physician happiness?  The Gallup organization took a closer look at hospitals, one place where physician practice is defined and sustained–for better or for worse…

“When doctors are frustrated, patient care and hospital revenues suffer. Heres how hospitals can engage their physicians — and make a positive impact on patients and the bottom line.”

via Gallup.Com – Daily News, Polls, Public Opinion on Politics, Economy, Wellbeing, and World.

Filed under: ACA and Medicaid, Behavioral Health Outcomes, Blogosphere, Cancer Treatment & Success, Health Literacy, Health Policy, Healthcare Reform, Maternal and Child Health, Medicaid, Medicaid Expansion, Medical Research, Medicare, New American Electorate, Polls and pollsters, Public Health

The HPV Vaccine: Access and Use in the U.S. | The Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation

Women’s health issues are intrinsically tied to men’s health.  This is evident in recent vaccine recommendations.

Vaccination rates have slowly been increasing for the two vaccines that protect young people against infection by certain strains of the human papillomavirus (HPV), the most common sexually transmitted infection (STI) in the United States.1  The vaccines were originally recommended only for girls and young women and were subsequently broadened to include the recommendations for boys and young men.  This factsheet discusses HPV and related cancers, use of the HPV vaccines for both females and males, and insurance coverage and access to the vaccines.

HPV and Cancer

There are more than 100 strains of HPV, and while most cases of HPV infection usually resolve on their own, there are more than 40 strains that can cause cancer.  Overall, HPV is related to almost 100% of cervical cancer cases.2 Cervical cancer is the main concern with HPV, but the disease is also known to cause oral, anal, vulvar, vaginal and penile cancers, as well as genital warts.1

HPV infection in the U.S. is widespread; there are more than 6 million new infections annually, and it is estimated that 50% of sexually active men and women will get HPV at some point in their lives.3 The highest rates are seen among women ages 20-24, with a prevalence rate of 45%.4

In the U.S., it is estimated that over 12,000 new cases and more than 4,000 deaths from cervical cancer will occur in 2013.5   In 2008, over 529,000 new cases of cervical cancer and 275,000 deaths attributed to cervical cancer occurred worldwide, with 86% of the cases in developing countries.6

Cervical cancer is usually treatable, especially when detected early; regular screening with Pap tests is critical for early detection.  Guidelines by the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommend that women ages 21 to 65 receive a Pap test once every three years.7

Despite widespread availability of pap testing, disparities in cervical cancer incidence, screening, and mortality rates by race and insurance status persist. African-American women have the highest mortality rates of the disease (Figure 1).5, 8

However, African American women also have the highest rates of recent pap testing to screen for the disease (81%, compared to 77% of White women and 70% of Asian women).9 Limited access to treatment and early detection, as well as cost, lack of physician referral, and cultural barriers may account for some of these disparities.10

Men are at a much lower risk than women for developing an HPV related cancer and suffer from less than 25% of reported cases.11

via The HPV Vaccine: Access and Use in the U.S. | The Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation.

Filed under: Blogosphere, Cancer Treatment & Success, Health Literacy, Health Policy, , , ,

The New Rules for Sunscreen

Sunshine and good health and  happiness go hand and hand.  Or do they?

Today the connection between cancer and over exposure to the sun’s warm rays is well documented and it seems to be growing…

“Here is some advice to bear in mind when selecting sunscreen:”

More via The New Rules for Sunscreen – NYTimes.com.

Filed under: Blogosphere, Cancer Treatment & Success, consumers, Health Literacy, , , , ,

Could Statins Raise Diabetes Risk? – WebMD

Drugs have serious, and sometimes fatal, side effects and too often unintended consequences.  But we are sick, and health professionals somehow perform a cost benefit analysis and risk assessment and recommend that we take this drug or that to help us deal with our health condition or else.

Medicine is evolving, medicines are just one variable in a complex medical intervention process and people simply do not behave well or as needed very often.

Like variables that are introduced to repair a broken swiss watch, drugs enter our body system and fix some things yet disturb others.

Medical interventions, as drug therapies, change our blood chemistry and many of the vital functions of our major organs and personal health processes in some way…

As our body systems and organs fail under the weight of heredity, diet, behavior, etc., scientists perform research and through trial and error attempt to produce substances that can be introduced into our sick body systems to address a needed substance or desired cause and effect to make us better.

Our lives and bodies are similar, so research  has some success, in a controlled experiment, showing that symptoms can be changed or controlled.  However, implementing these medical solutions in the daily routine of our unique yet complex lives is another story.

Diet, exercise and behavior in general are also modified when we become sick and our body changes due to powerful drugs we are advised to take.

As each of us goes through life experiencing disease, we benefit from therapies, if we are “lucky” enough to have access to them, in varying ways.

“Certain statins — the widely used cholesterol-lowering drugs — may increase your chances of developing type 2 diabetes, a new study suggests.

The risk was greatest for patients taking atorvastatin (brand name Lipitor), rosuvastatin (Crestor) and simvastatin (Zocor), the study said.

Focusing on almost 500,000 Ontario residents, researchers …”

More via Could Statins Raise Diabetes Risk? – WebMD.

Filed under: Aging, Behavioral Health Outcomes, Blogosphere, Cancer Treatment & Success, consumers, Death and Dying, Health and Exercise, Health Literacy, Health Policy, Healthcare Reform, Medical Research, Medicare, News, Public Health, , , , , , , ,

Human genomics: The new world of DNA | The Economist

Stuck in with the nasty weather outside?  Here is a nice read while you’re wondering what to do with your unexpected day off:  A thoughtful article to get you caught up on what is happening in genome research …

“WHEN John Keats read George Chapman’s translation of Homer he felt, in his elevated, poetical way, like …”

 

More via Human genomics: The new world of DNA | The Economist.

Filed under: Blogosphere, Cancer Treatment & Success, consumers, Culture Think, Health Literacy, Health Policy, Healthcare Reform, Medical Research, News, Public Health, Public Policy, , , , ,

French study finds tumours in rats fed GM corn | Reuters

Rats fed a lifetime diet of Monsanto’s genetically modified corn or exposed to its top-selling weedkiller Roundup suffered tumours and multiple organ damage, according to a French study published on …

More via French study finds tumours in rats fed GM corn | Reuters.

Filed under: Blogosphere, Cancer Treatment & Success, Health Literacy, Health Policy, Medical Research, , ,

Scientists Make Progress in Tailor-Made Organs – NYTimes.com

Andemariam Beyene sat by the hospital window, the low Arctic sun on his face, and talked about the time he thought he would …

More via Scientists Make Progress in Tailor-Made Organs – NYTimes.com.

Filed under: Blogosphere, Cancer Treatment & Success, Culture Think, Death and Dying, Health Literacy, Health Policy, Medical Research, News,

Ovarian Cancer Screenings Are Not Effective, Panel Says – NYTimes.com

Tests commonly recommended to screen healthy women for ovarian cancer do more harm than good and should not be performed, a …

More via Ovarian Cancer Screenings Are Not Effective, Panel Says – NYTimes.com.

Filed under: Blogosphere, Cancer Treatment & Success, consumers, Death and Dying, Gender, Gender Policy, Health Literacy, Health Policy, Healthcare Reform, Medical Research, News, Women's rights, ,

Where Cows Are Happy and Food Is Healthy – NYTimes.com

FOOD can be depressing. If it’s tasty, it’s carcinogenic. If it’s cheap, animals were tortured.

But this, miraculously, is a …

MORE via Where Cows Are Happy and Food Is Healthy – NYTimes.com.

Filed under: Blogosphere, Cancer Treatment & Success, consumers, Health Literacy, Health Policy, News, ,

For a Lung Cancer, Drug Treatment May Be Within Reach – NYTimes.com

The first large and comprehensive study of the genetics of a common lung cancer finds that more than half the tumors from that cancer have mutations that might be treated by new drugs that are already in the pipeline or …

MORE via For a Lung Cancer, Drug Treatment May Be Within Reach – NYTimes.com.

Filed under: Blogosphere, Cancer Treatment & Success, consumers, Death and Dying, Health Literacy, Health Policy, Healthcare Reform, News, ,

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 2,253 other followers

ThePolicyThinkShop @Twitter

Health Alert!

Patriotic Clean, we're headed for deep waters!  It's your choice ...
Conflict at work: Stick to your principles

Conflict at work: Stick to your principles and they will take you far ...

Resources and Latests News: Top Clicks

  • None

Who we are:


Public Policy for the rest of us...

Provided by: PolicyABCs

Moderated by: The Policy Think Shop

Categories

We are on Twitter too!

!function(d,s,id){var js,fjs=d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0];if(!d.getElementById(id)){js=d.createElement(s);js.id=id;js.src="//platform.twitter.com/widgets.js";fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js,fjs);}}(document,"script","twitter-wjs");

Recent Posts from our new PolicyABCs Blog: PolicyABCs ... "Thinks with us ..."

We cannot load blog data at this time.

Thank you for visiting. Here are ways you can stay connected to us.

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 2,253 other followers

Goodreads

The ThinkShop promotes connections to all forms of social media to bring you resources beyond what you’ll find in your daily routine…

How Hispanics Describe Themselves

How Hispanics Describe Themselves

Poli Thinkshop

Create Your Badge

Take a "Brain Break" and visit this "fun link" by clicking this image now...

Break for Fun… click video below or have more fun by clicking the pic above…

Policy ThinkShop: Relax, we did the research for you…

Welcome to Policy ABC's ThinkShop, where getting news and public policy analysis is as easy as "A B C."

"The Policy ThinkShop team works hard researching the latests and most interesting news and reports. The resulting links will point you to the original sources so that you can spend as little time as possible getting the most news possible."

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 2,253 other followers

The Policy ThinkShop

ThinkShop Wordle

The Policy ThinkShop

Public Policy and Culture

Policy ThinkShop Resources

Policy ThinkShop Resources for your policy work

Our experts do the searching and serve up the best resources to help you stay on top of key public policy issues.

Featured Twitter Friend: Health Literacy ABCs

Health Literacy

Twitter Friend: MigrationPundit

Policy ThinkShop: “THINK TOGETHER”

"Policy is codified knowledge that stands as a universal guide for social action. Public policy is shaped by those who know and who act on that knowledge. We at The Policy ThinkShop share information so others can think and act in the best possible understanding of "The Public Interest."
%d bloggers like this: