THE POLICY THINKSHOP "Think Together"

Public Policy is social agreement written down as a universal guide for social action. We at The Policy ThinkShop share information so others can think and act in the best possible understanding of "The Public Interest."

The Long Battle to Rethink Mental Illness in Children – WSJ.com

Since infancy, Max Brown, 11, has flown into a rage at the smallest of slights, such as being told ‘no.’

Holed up in windowless hotel conference rooms near Washington, D.C., scientists have been busy rewriting the bible of American mental …

More via The Long Battle to Rethink Mental Illness in Children – WSJ.com.

Filed under: access to education, Behavioral Health Outcomes, Blogosphere, Child Abuse, Children and Poverty, Culture Think, Discrimination, Education Policy, Education Reform, Health Literacy, Health Policy, Healthcare Reform, Kid Power, Maternal and Child Health, Medical Research, News, Parenting, , , ,

Daily Multivitamin May Reduce Cancer Risk, Clinical Trial Finds – NYTimes.com

After a series of conflicting reports about whether vitamin pills can stave off chronic disease, researchers announced on Wednesday that a large clinical trial of nearly 15,000 older male doctors followed for more than a decade found that those …

More via Daily Multivitamin May Reduce Cancer Risk, Clinical Trial Finds – NYTimes.com.

Filed under: Blogosphere, consumers, Health Literacy, Medical Research, News, , ,

Kaiser’s Monthly Update on Health Disparities – Kaiser Family Foundation

A recent study published in the American Journal of Public Health found that the association between maternal education and the risk of preterm birth has changed over time.

According to the study, little research has considered how the relationship between social determinants of health and health outcomes may have changed over time. The study examined the influence of maternal education on risk of preterm birth (PTB) from 1989 to 2006. Using birth data compiled by the Michigan Department of Community Health, the study sampled 1,876,471 singleton births to women aged 22 years or older in the state. The primary health indicator was PTB, defined as birth at less than 37 gestational weeks. Maternal educational attainment was defined as less than 12 years of education and no GED, high school diploma or GED, or college degree or greater. The study also captured several other covariates: race (white or black), maternal age (22-35 and 36 years of age or older), and number of previous births (0, 1, or 2). The data set was stratified and births were analyzed by year of occurrence. PTB risk was calculated by year, stratified by maternal educational attainment, and regression models were used to calculate the relative risk of PTB. The researchers found that maternal education may be less protective against PTB now than in years past. The study found changes in the relationship between education and PTB risk over time, particularly for women with the highest levels of education. PTB risk increased over time for the most educated, but did not change for the least educated women—effectively narrowing the gap. Previous studies have documented narrowing disparities in PTB risk outside of the U.S., however there is no consensus regarding the changing relationship between these variables over time.

via Kaiser’s Monthly Update on Health Disparities – Kaiser Family Foundation.

Filed under: access to education, Blogosphere, Children and Poverty, Election 2012, Feminization of Poverty, Gender Policy, Health Literacy, Health Policy, Healthcare Reform, Maternal and Child Health, Medical Research, News, Parenting, Public Health, Public Policy, , , ,

The Nobel prize for chemistry: Hitting the G-spot | The Economist

THE Nobel chemistry prize, as is now almost traditional, went for work that might equally have won one of the other two—in this case the prize for physiology. The laureates were Robert Lefkowitz of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute and Brian Kobilka of Stanford University, who between them laid the groundwork for the study of what are known as G-protein-coupled …

More via The Nobel prize for chemistry: Hitting the G-spot | The Economist.

Filed under: Blogosphere, Medical Research,

6 tips to prevent neck, shoulder pain when using an iPad or computer — Harvard Health Publications – Harvard Health Publications

Hours spent using an iPad or other tablet can cause neck and shoulder problems. Blame it on the viewing angle. A simple shift can change everything, reports the October 2012 Harvard Health Letter.

Holding a tablet computer too low, say on the lap, forces the neck to bend forward too much, straining and possibly even injuring muscles, nerves, tendons, ligaments, or spinal discs. Simply placing a tablet on a table propped at an angle in a tablet case can reduce neck strain and potential pain, according to research conducted by Dr. Jack Dennerlein and his colleagues at the Harvard School of Public Health.

One of the best things to do, no matter what kind of computer you are using, is take a break. “Change your position every 15 minutes,” says Dr. Dennerlein, an adjunct professor of ergonomics and safety at the Harvard School of Public Health. Other tips include:

When using an iPad or tablet:

Use a case that positions the device at a comfortable viewing angle

Take a break every 15 minutes

Routinely shift hands and weight; stand up if seated, or sit down if standing …

MOre via 6 tips to prevent neck, shoulder pain when using an iPad or computer — Harvard Health Publications – Harvard Health Publications.

Filed under: access to education, Blogosphere, consumers, Health Literacy, Medical Research, News, Technology and You, ,

Congress widens scrutiny of meningitis outbreak | Reuters

Lawmakers on Friday widened their investigation into the deadly meningitis outbreak to include the role state regulators played in monitoring the pharmacy that produced steroid treatments blamed for …

More via Congress widens scrutiny of meningitis outbreak | Reuters.

Filed under: Blogosphere, Death and Dying, Health Literacy, Health Policy, Medical Research, News, , ,

The spread of disease: Germs and money | The Economist

ON OCTOBER 2nd a British traveller, flying home to Glasgow from Afghanistan, began to feel ill. Within hours he was diagnosed with Crimean-Congo Haemorrhagic Fever, a virus nasty enough for him to be put onto a military transport aircraft for transfer to an isolation hospital in London. Less than 24 hours later he was dead.

This outbreak, on top of another death last month in Saudi Arabia from a previously unknown virus, a cousin of the Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS), has set global health agencies on …

More via The spread of disease: Germs and money | The Economist.

Filed under: Blogosphere, Death and Dying, Health Literacy, Health Policy, Healthcare Reform, Medical Research, News, Public Health, , , ,

Meningitis outbreak widens amid demands for criminal probe | Reuters

The pharmacy at the center of a deadly U.S. meningitis outbreak possibly linked to tainted steroid injections faced mounting federal and state scrutiny on …

More via Meningitis outbreak widens amid demands for criminal probe | Reuters.

Filed under: Blogosphere, consumers, Crimes and Misdemeanors, Medical Research, News, Public Health, Public Policy

Spinal Steroid Injections Have History of Trouble – NYTimes.com

Perry D. Clark says that a steroid injected near his spine to relieve persistent back pain instead left him “way, way worse.” Twelve years later, he still suffers from continuous stinging in his legs and feet and occasional bursts of …

More via Spinal Steroid Injections Have History of Trouble – NYTimes.com.

Filed under: Blogosphere, consumers, Medical Research, News, Parenting, ,

National Health Service Corps: Public Sector Choice for Minority Physicians

National Health Service Corps

The full-time National Health Service Corps Loan Repayment Program offers up to $60,000 in tax-free loan repayment for 2 years of service, and up to $140,000 for a total of 5 years of service.

National Health Service Corps scholars commit to serve in the Corps upon completion of their training — 1 year for each year of support (at least 2 years).

The Students to Service Loan Repayment Program provides loan repayment assistance of up to $120,000 to medical students (MD and DO) in their last year of school, in return for a commitment to provide primary health care services in eligible Health Professional Shortage Areas of greatest need for at least 3 years.

The State Loan Repayment Program provides grants to states to operate their own loan repayment programs. Similar to the NHSC Loan Repayment Program, participants in the state programs provide primary health services in Health Professional Shortage Areas in exchange for repayment of their qualifying educational loans.  States are required to match federal grant funds dollar-for-dollar with non-federal funds.

According to self-reports by the nearly 10,000 Corps clinicians currently providing care – 13 percent are African American, 10 percent are Hispanic, 7 percent are Asian or Pacific Islander, and 2 percent are American Indian or Alaska Native.

In FY 2012, African American physicians represent 17 percent of the Corps physicians which exceeds their 6.3 percent representation within the national physician workforce. And,

Hispanic physicians represent 16 percent of the Corps physicians, exceeding their 5.5 percent representation in the national physician workforce.

According to self-reports more than half of by the nearly 1,000 Corps scholars in the pipeline are minorities – 26 percent are Hispanic, 19 percent are African American, 12 percent are Asian or Pacific Islander, and 2 percent are American Indian or Alaska Native.

via National Health Service Corps.

Filed under: access to education, African American, Blogosphere, Culture Think, Discrimination, Education Policy, Education Reform, Election 2012, ethnicity in politics, Health Literacy, Health Policy, Healthcare Reform, Job Sector, Latinos, Medical Research, News, Public Policy, Public Sector, Racism, Unemployment, , , , ,

Roche, Lilly drugs chosen for Alzheimer’s trial | Reuters

Experimental drugs from Roche Holding AG and Eli Lilly & Co have been selected for a global Alzheimer’s disease prevention trial, and a second Lilly drug is being considered for inclusion in the study, Washington University said on Wednesday.

The trial, expected to begin in early 2013, will enroll …

More via Roche, Lilly drugs chosen for Alzheimer’s trial | Reuters.

Filed under: Aging, Behavioral Health Outcomes, Blogosphere, consumers, Death and Dying, Medical Research, News

The 2011 Nobel prizes: Expanding horizons | The Economist

THE rules say it is not allowed. But this year a Nobel prize was awarded to a dead man. Ralph Steinman of Rockefeller University in New York, who discovered the role of dendritic cells in activating the immune system, died on September 30th. That news did not, however, make it across the Atlantic Ocean in time, and on October 3rd the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm honoured Dr Steinman with half of this year’s prize in …

More via The 2011 Nobel prizes: Expanding horizons | The Economist.

Filed under: Blogosphere, Culture Think, Literature & Literati, Mass Media and Public Opinion, Medical Research, News, Philanthropy, The Western Imagination, WeSeeReason, ,

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 2,351 other followers

ThePolicyThinkShop @Twitter

Patriotic Clean, we're headed for deep waters!  It's your choice ...
Conflict at work: Stick to your principles

Conflict at work: Stick to your principles and they will take you far ...

This Seat is Taken!

This Seat is Taken!

This Seat is Taken!

Who we are:


Public Policy for the rest of us...

Provided by: PolicyABCs

Moderated by: The Policy Think Shop

Categories

We are on Twitter too!

!function(d,s,id){var js,fjs=d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0];if(!d.getElementById(id)){js=d.createElement(s);js.id=id;js.src="//platform.twitter.com/widgets.js";fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js,fjs);}}(document,"script","twitter-wjs");

Thank you for visiting. Here are ways you can stay connected to us.

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 2,351 other followers

The ThinkShop promotes connections to all forms of social media to bring you resources beyond what you’ll find in your daily routine…

How Hispanics Describe Themselves

How Hispanics Describe Themselves

Poli Thinkshop

Create Your Badge

Take a "Brain Break" and visit this "fun link" by clicking this image now...

Break for Fun… click video below or have more fun by clicking the pic above…

Policy ThinkShop: Relax, we did the research for you…

Welcome to Policy ABC's ThinkShop, where getting news and public policy analysis is as easy as "A B C."

"The Policy ThinkShop team works hard researching the latests and most interesting news and reports. The resulting links will point you to the original sources so that you can spend as little time as possible getting the most news possible."

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 2,351 other followers

The Policy ThinkShop

ThinkShop Wordle

The Policy ThinkShop

Public Policy and Culture

CultureWebs and Policy

Policy ThinkShop Resources

Policy ThinkShop Resources for your policy work

Our experts do the searching and serve up the best resources to help you stay on top of key public policy issues.

Featured Twitter Friend: Health Literacy ABCs

Health Literacy

Twitter Friend: MigrationPundit

Policy ThinkShop: “THINK TOGETHER”

"Policy is codified knowledge that stands as a universal guide for social action. Public policy is shaped by those who know and who act on that knowledge. We at The Policy ThinkShop share information so others can think and act in the best possible understanding of "The Public Interest."
Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 2,351 other followers

%d bloggers like this: